What Tier 4 Final Emissions Really Means

December 30, 2014 at 3:57 PMRing Power

Since 1996, a “tiered” series of emissions regulations has been in effect, establishing progressively stringent standards for allowable levels of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) released into the environment by new off-road and non-road diesel engines and equipment.

Essentially, Tier 0 engines are unregulated and most often mechanically rather than electronically controlled; Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3 engines include technologies that have become increasingly sophisticated with each successive generation, using electronic engine controls, higher injection pressures and turbocharging systems to meet the emissions standards at each level.

The Tier 4 standards currently in force were actually initiated in 2008, with a goal of reducing PM and NOx emissions to a level 50-96 percent lower than the existing generation of diesel engines by 2015. A transitional step – Tier 4 Interim – was introduced in 2011, which required substantial reduction in PM while allowing for flexibility in lowering NOx. Tier 4 Final, which went into effect earlier this year, has tightened the standards for further reductions in NOx and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions.

To meet current emissions standards, Caterpillar and many other manufacturers have incorporated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology into their engine and equipment design. As a result, Cat dealers have had to learn how to service and maintain the innovative new systems and componentry that comprise this new technology.

For example, open crankcase ventilation filters (OCVs) need to be serviced or replaced periodically and diesel particulate filters (DPFs) need to be cleaned at regular intervals by a qualified technician. You may also find that belts, hoses, radiators and alternators require more frequent inspection due to the higher temperatures and operating pressures.

In addition, Tier 4 engines require ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and CJ-4 low ash oil for a cleaner burn. Engines and equipment outfitted with SCR technology have a separate, on-board storage tank to hold the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) used in after-treatment, which in turn requires special handling – and special mention here.

Tier 4 equipment owners need to understand the importance of working only with reliable vendors when purchasing DEF; and of storing their own supply in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area, out of direct sunlight. Manufactured to strict standards, DEF is a carefully blended solution of 32.5 percent high purity urea and 67.5 percent deionized water. Because temperature and time inevitably alter its concentration, DEF storage containers must be clearly dated. Contamination also affects concentration, which means storage containers must be clean and used exclusively for DEF.

 

The good news

By and large, meeting Tier 4 Final emissions standards is the responsibility of the engine manufacturers and equipment dealers. When the time comes to purchase new equipment, all you need to know is that your equipment dealer is prepared to provide the new maintenance practices required by the new components and technologies that come standard on Tier 4 Final engines.

Until then, you need not worry about Tier 4 Final at all. Tier 4 emissions requirements apply to new products only – not retroactively to any existing equipment – and at present there is no federal requirement to upgrade any existing engine to meet the new standards. Furthermore, Ring Power will be able to sell Tier 3 engines and equipment until the inventory is depleted and to service all previous generations indefinitely.

However, if your work involves bidding on governmental or public sector contracts, owning Tier 4 machines may give you a competitive edge. In that case, Ring Power has the inventory and expertise to assist you before, during and after your purchase – including Tier 4 classes for owners and operators – to help ensure you get the improved fuel efficiency, power and performance promised by the new emissions reduction technology.  

You are in good hands

Ring Power’s staff of training instructors and technical communicators have attended all of the Tier 4 training programs required by Caterpillar and are well prepared, not only to perform troubleshooting, maintenance and repair on Tier 4 Final engines, but also to instruct and train the service technician team.

Ring Power’s training department offers rigorous, ongoing Tier 4 Final training to bring service technicians up to speed with respect to the new, lower-emissions technology across all Ring Power equipment divisions. Any new machine – not just Cat, but any type, make or model of construction equipment, generator, air compressor, crane or forklift – that has a compression ignition diesel engine must now comply with Tier 4 Final regulations. To that end, Ring Power also requires all service technicians to enroll in the online curricula and hands-on training offered by their respective manufacturers.

 

The real bottom line

Although it sometimes seems a bitter pill to swallow, we need to remember that stricter emissions regulations were not imposed to punish companies that do off-road work or suppliers of off-road equipment. Every on-road vehicle has had to conform and comply, too. And, in the end, we all will be better off for it.

According to the EPA, reducing these emissions will annually prevent 12,000 premature deaths, 8,900 hospitalizations and one million workdays lost by the year 2030. Our children and our children’s children will thank us.

Posted in: Heavy Equipment | Power Systems

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How to Buy Used Equipment

November 20, 2014 at 9:40 AMRing Power

Used Equipment Buying Guide

In today’s economy, controlling the spiraling costs associated with buying and maintaining equipment can be an important part of staying profitable.

Too often, equipment purchasing decisions are viewed as an unenviable dilemma: pay a premium for a new machine or deal with the long-term added service costs of buying used.

However, reductive thinking such as this can easily lead to paying too much when a less-expensive machine will do. Taking the time to research your purchase beforehand is essential. When it comes to used heavy equipment, knowing how to shop smartly will allow you to choose a machine that will deliver a lifetime of reliable performance at a fraction of the cost of buying new.

About Ring Power

When it comes to buying new or used construction equipment, no one in Florida understands the needs of today’s construction companies, mining and agribusiness operators, building managers and other small, medium and large contractors better than Ring Power. Since 1962, Ring Power has been a vital ally to anyone in the market for CatÒ heavy equipment throughout the state and beyond.

With 26 locations in the southeast region, there’s no better partner to a growing business of any size. When you trust Ring Power for your new or used equipment needs, you benefit from:

Genuine Cat quality — As the legendary brand’s only representative in north and central Florida, Ring Power offers factory authorized repairs and exclusive service programs, such as the Cat Scheduled Oil Sampling (SOS) protocol. What this means is that your purchase will be maintained to the highest standards and will continue to deliver exceptional performance for as long as you own it.

The largest parts inventory — Ring Power maintains one of the largest inventories of Cat equipment parts in the southeast United States. Whether you need repairs or scheduled maintenance, we can quickly provide the items you need to minimize disruption to your fleet.

24-hour service — When an unexpected issue is threatening your productivity, only Ring Power can provide emergency repairs to the high standards set by the Cat brand. Our team of field technicians is available around the clock for service that gets you back up and running quickly. With more than 600 field service vehicles, there’s no repair, maintenance or diagnostic issue we can’t handle. One call to our toll-free number is all it takes to get a team dispatched to your location.

To find out more about what Ring Power can do for you, or to view our current inventory of new and used heavy equipment, contact a location near you today.

Why Buy Used?

The most obvious benefit to buying used construction equipment is the lower purchase price. When buying used, fleet owners can afford a higher caliber of machine than they would otherwise be able to afford if they were limited to new. This translates to increased productivity, greater fuel efficiency and lower operating costs overall. Some of the other benefits of buying used construction equipment include:

  • Loss value

    Avoiding depreciation — Depreciation schedules for used construction equipment aren’t linear. That means resale values don’t continue to depreciate at the same rate over time. While most machines will lose between 20-40% of their value within a year of being purchased, values remain relatively stable following that — as long as all major components are well-maintained. When you buy a machine that’s more than a year old, you effectively save this initial depreciation while still getting something that’s relatively new and good for a lifetime of use.
  • Resale value — Due to the uneven depreciation schedules of most construction equipment, a machine bought used will retain a large portion of its value if serviced properly. Be sure to keep records of all repairs and preventative maintenance, as these will increase your equipment’s resale potential.
  • Similar technology — Historically, the heavy equipment industry has been slow to adopt new technologies. This means that the important components of a given piece of machinery, on a year to year basis, are relatively unchanged. By buying used, you will save money while still getting a machine that’s well equipped to handle the challenges of the future.
  • Available warranties —  Most reputable used equipment dealers, such as Ring Power, offer comprehensive warranties, preventative maintenance plans, and other service agreements for all used construction equipment. This means you can shop with confidence knowing your purchase will be backed up by a reputable team you can trust to deliver on their promises.
  • Easier training — While the nuts and bolts of a used tractor, used dozer, used skid steer loader or other machine are unlikely to vary significantly, certain changes from year to year — particularly those relating to control systems — may require time-consuming retraining of your staff. Buying used allows you to purchase a machine your team is already comfortable with, so you can maintain productivity even as you upgrade your fleet.
  • No wait times — The training issue speaks to a larger concern when buying both new and used equipment for construction. We all know that time is money, and for most owner/operators, the expense of purchasing any machine will need to be offset by a quick return to full productivity. When buying new, delivery times can run to weeks or even months, particularly if additional work tools or other modifications are required. By buying used, you get a machine that is ready to be put into service immediately.

Is used construction equipment automatically a better value than new? Not always. For many contractors, buying new equipment represents an important investment in the future of their business. However, automatically dismissing a used machine as more expensive to operate and maintain can be a costly mistake. As with all things, exercising due diligence when shopping for machinery is essential. By looking critically at the value new machinery brings vs. the lower cost of buying used, you will be better positioned to evaluate your needs and make the best purchase decision for the long term.

The key to making a successful long-term decision involves knowing what to look for when shopping for used Cat equipment. We’ve gone into depth and created a general used construction equipment buying guide that will allow you to do just that.

How to Value Used Construction Equipment

Whether you’re in the market for used construction equipment, used agricultural equipment or any other heavy machinery, your primary consideration is likely to be purchase price. When setting your budget, you should consider how you will arrange financing, what the long-term implications of an equipment lease will be to your operating budget, and what the anticipated operating costs will be for a given piece of equipment.

How much money should you spend on used equipment?

Obviously, your goal should be to choose the machine that will offer the best long-term value. While there are clear advantages to paying extra for a newer or better-equipped machine, exceeding your budget by too much can limit your ability to grow going forward. When setting a budget, ask yourself:

How long do I plan on using this machine? How will it fit into my long-term business plan? Is buying outright really the best decision, or should I consider renting?

  • Will my purchase meet the future needs of my business? Is there a realistic potential for growth in expanding my fleet?
  • What will the operating costs be? Will future upgrades be required to meet emissions or other regulatory guidelines?
  • What will be required to train staff? Who will use this new machine, and what are the occupational health implications of expanding my fleet?
  • How will I service my purchase? Are my in-house technicians properly equipped to perform required maintenance and repairs, or will I have to outsource mechanical work?

A hard look at these and other important questions is essential to thinking broadly about your used equipment needs.

Knowing What to Pay

Unlike cars and on-highway trucks, there’s no particular resource for pricing heavy equipment. Because of the high degree of customizability for individual machines, those in the market for a used asphalt paver, used crane truck or other piece of heavy equipment can’t simply turn to the equivalent of the Kelly Blue Book for high and low values.

A few online resources, including the Equipment Watch Green Guide and Fastline, will make your search easier. However, neither can be considered a comprehensive or authoritative used heavy equipment price guide. (The Green Guide, in particular, requires a $1900 annual subscription fee, limiting its usefulness to all but dealers and auction houses.)

When you’re shopping for used heavy equipment, the only way to be sure you’re getting a fair deal is to do the research yourself. Prices for different machines can vary considerably from region to region. Check with your local used construction equipment dealer and account for any additional work tools or other upgrades you may need to configure a machine to your specific purposes.

For in-depth assistance, contact a Ring Power representative today.

Factors Affecting Purchase Prices

Knowing how to value used construction equipment is an inexact science. A number of different factors will affect the price a given machine will command on the market — often in unpredictable ways. When performing market research or shopping for a used machine, bear in mind the impact the following factors can have on pricing:

Age and Hours

The value of used construction equipment does not depreciate evenly over time. Instead, about a year after purchase, depreciation slows and values remain relatively consistent provided the machine stays in good condition. At this point, the number of hours on the machine begins to play a larger role in determining resale values. An older machine with low hours that has been properly maintained will fetch more than one that shows its age more evidently.

Manaufacturer

It should come as no surprise that the manufacturer’s reputation plays a large role in determining the value of used construction equipment. One of the reasons why Cat equipment holds its value so well is because of the company’s Certified Rebuild program. Thanks to modular components that can be reconditioned, rebuilt or replaced, Cat machines have a built-in “second life” that will continue to deliver productivity for years to come.

Options and Tooling

The ability to do more in the field is an important selling point for any piece of used heavy equipment. It only makes sense that a machine that is better equipped will command a higher price than a bare-bones model. However, it’s important to remember that additional features will require additional maintenance and increased training time — don’t be swayed by bells and whistles that won’t add long-term value to your fleet.

Seller Reputation

The vendor selling a used machine can play an important role in determining its market value — especially when compared to the uncertainty of buying from an unknown vendor. For example, many of the used generators, skid steer loaders and other equipment for sale at Ring Power have been sourced from our rental fleet. As a result, individual units have a detailed service history verifying that all regular maintenance has been performed to the highest standards. A reputable used Cat equipment vendor will also allow potential buyers to inspect and test equipment, and will back up everything they sell with some level of warranty support.

Market Factors

You don’t need a degree in economics to know that shifting market conditions play a role in how the value of a used construction machine or generator is determined. A slow economy means less money is being spent on construction and infrastructure development. In turn, this means fewer potential purchasers for used machines, which drives down prices and gives buyers more room to negotiate. Seasonal and location-specific variations can also have an impact on certain machines — during peak local construction and logging times, used heavy equipment will be in greater demand and will command higher prices.

Renting vs. Buying: Understanding Operating Costs

With the many factors that determine how to value used construction equipment, many fleet owners opt for the more stable costs associated with renting, particularly for short-term or one-off projects.

Is renting a better option for your business? The answer may not be as straightforward as you think. For an in-depth look at the bottom line costs associated with renting and owning used construction equipment, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers publishes a comprehensive Construction Equipment Ownership and Operating Expense Schedule that can be useful. The guide offers region-specific methodology for determining the operating costs of different types of heavy equipment, including local gas and diesel prices, electricity costs, import, tax and freight rates, and more. You’ll be able to determine hourly operating costs, which can then be referenced against rental rates to determine the best overall option for a one-off job.

Making a Smart Purchase

Once you have identified your equipment needs and settled on a budget that’s both realistic for the type of machine you want and within your means, you can begin the process of looking at potential purchases. Here, again, some research and a critical eye will be essential allies when making a decision.

To ensure you get a machine that delivers reliable performance and a solid return on your investment, you need to know a potential purchase is both mechanically and structurally sound. Any reputable used heavy equipment vendor will allow you to perform a thorough inspection before making a decision.

5 important Areas to Look at When Buying Used Equipment

  • Cab — Operator comfort and visibility are important considerations when inspecting the cab of any used machine. A well-designed and well-maintained cab means greater productivity, lower training costs and less time spent on rework. Some features to look for include adjustable seat height, back and lumbar support, armrests, steps, hand rails and adjustable, well-laid out controls.

If you have the opportunity to try out the machine, check for visibility, vibrations through the seat or floor, noise and temperature levels, and any reflections, glares or other distractions. While many of these things may seem like minor nuisances at first, try to imagine yourself working an eight hour shift in the machine — what factors will impede your comfort and productivity over the course of the day? Can they be easily fixed or altered to provide a better user experience? If not, would a different machine be better suited to the task?

  • Chassis — A visual inspection of a machine’s chassis can tell you a lot about its condition. Look closely for evidence of leaks, particularly in the engine compartment, around hydraulic components and near any other hoses, pumps and rams. Check for parts that have been welded or other indications of a prior repair, particularly by sprockets, tracks, locks and arms.

Get underneath the machine and inspect the undercarriage for damage, repairs or worn parts that will require replacing. Make sure you look for cracked windows and other cosmetic damages that haven’t been fixed. While a well-used machine can be expected to display some wear and tear, the presence of potential safety hazards that are left unaddressed can indicate a lack of upkeep.

  • Engine/transmission — The engine and transmission are two of the most important components of any machine, so it pays to do your due diligence and thoroughly inspect both for signs of wear. If necessary, bring along an experienced operator who knows what to look for.

Start the engine and listen for any abnormal noises, look for smoke, and check to ensure all gauges are working properly and no error messages come up. Put the transmission into gear and see how smoothly it goes. Move the machine forwards and backwards, and listen for any squeaks or noises that may indicate worn-out rollers or other components. Lastly, step outside the machine and make sure exhaust emissions are properly vented and that all moving parts, hot surfaces and other potential safety hazards are guarded.

  • Hydraulics/work tools — While hydraulic cylinders can be rebuilt or replaced, doing so is often expensive and time-consuming. Knowing of any issues beforehand will help you make a more informed purchase decision. Look for leaks and worn seals in the pump compartment and along the swing bearing. Check for excessive play or other control issues that may indicate a history of improper use. Inspect all included work tools for wear issues, such as scalloping in excavator buckets. If you plan on purchasing additional attachments, make sure the machine has the necessary hydraulic lines to support them, if applicable.
  • Tracks/tires — Replacing work tracks and tires can be expensive. Check for any missing bolts or tracks on track-type machines. Check tires for bulges or cracks, both of which are common on machines that are stored outside. Bring a tread gauge to determine wear on tires. Tires that are worn unevenly may indicate suspension or drivetrain issues on certain machines. Visit the tire manufacturer’s website to check replacement requirements and costs. While this information should be included on any inspection report provided to you by the vendor, it’s important to double check for yourself to be sure.

Ultimately, your experience and intuition as an owner/operator is essential when shopping for used machinery. Be sure to ask questions and bring along other team members with expertise in a given piece of equipment. The more trustworthy eyes you have on a potential purchase, the more informed you will be about its overall condition and future maintenance costs.

The Importance of Diagnostics and Service Histories

Evidence of regular maintenance is one of the most important roles in determining the value of used construction equipment. A machine that has been treated well will have fewer problems in the long term, making it worth paying extra for initially.

Ask to see all maintenance records and confirm that the engine, transmission, hydraulics, suspension and other parts have been maintained according to the manufacturer’s guidelines. Take note of any major repairs that were performed, particularly if they appear to recur in a specific problem area.

While newly-replaced parts can be an important selling point, they may also indicate a history of improper use or neglect. Ask both why a repair was performed and how it was done — the use of OEM parts and the following of manufacturer’s repair vs. replace guidelines all indicate an appropriate level of care has been taken.

One indicator that due care has been taken with a machine’s maintenance is a record of regular oil analysis, such as the Cat Scheduled Oil Sampling (SOS) protocol. The presence of metal particulates in a machine’s engine and hydraulic oil indicates wear on replaceable components. Tracking levels of different metals provides a key insight into the condition of these parts over time. While oil sampling is most effective when performed at regular intervals, it can also be helpful as part of a pre-purchase inspection. Ask that a full report and analysis be provided before making any decision to buy.

Contact Ring Power for Used Construction Equipment in Central Florida

Like any major purchase or business decision, buying used construction equipment requires a careful consideration of your needs, both now and in the future. By partnering with Ring Power, you’ll gain a trusted ally who will work with you to select the machine that delivers the most value for your purchasing dollar. If you’re in the central or northern Florida area, contact one of our 26 locations for immediate assistance with all your used construction equipment needs.

Ring Power's Major Component Rebuild Center Achieves Timken Certification

November 5, 2014 at 3:54 PMRing Power

Ring Power’s Major Component Rebuild Center in St. Augustine, Fla., recently became “Timken Bearing Certified.” This designation was awarded after a rigorous evaluation by a Timken engineer documented the quality of processes and equipment in place to properly store, remove, install and maintain bearings. Timken Bearing Certification is only awarded to shops that adhere to the highest standards in bearing service. The Timken Certification is a specialized requirement from certain Department of Defense agencies, NASA and manufacturers who must adhere to the most critical tolerances and quality processes. Congratulations to the MCRC team on achieving this outstanding recognition.

Ring Power's specialization shops in St. Augustine and Tampa offer more than 61,000 square feet of work area combined, and 23 Caterpillar® certified technicians working two full-time shifts on Engine, Transmission and Torque Converter Rebuilds; Power Train Component Rebuilds; and Engine Component Services. 

Posted in: Heavy Equipment | Service

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Ring Power Corporation Now an Authorized Towmaster Dealer

August 7, 2014 at 9:51 AMRing Power

Ring Power Corporation has signed an agreement to represent Towmaster Trailers through its Heavy Equipment and Cat Rental Store divisions.

Towmaster manufactures nine- to 20-ton Tag Trailers, 20- to 50-ton Tilt Trailers, and 70- to 120-ton Detachable Gooseneck Trailers, designed for hauling construction and rental equipment and built to withstand years of heavy use.

Headquartered in Litchfield, Minn., Towmaster Inc. has been manufacturing trailers since the early 1970s and is well respected for the quality of their products. For more information on Towmaster trailers, click here.

Posted in: Cat Rental Store | Heavy Equipment

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One Chapter Ends, Another Begins for Think Big Students

August 5, 2014 at 3:52 PMRing Power

Think Big Graduates Niels Akkerman & John Harrison

On June 5, Niels Akkerman, John Hugo and John Harrison graduated from the Think Big Program.

The two-year, hands-on service technician scholarship program is offered by Ring Power and five other Southeast Cat dealers in partnership with South Georgia Technical College in Americus, Ga. Akkerman, Hugo and Harrison were the 12th group to graduate from the program since its launch in 2000.

Akkerman, an honor graduate, was inspired to get into the program after attending Construction Career Days as a high school student in Orlando. Construction Career Days, a hands-on event Ring Power’s training department participates in every year, introduces students to the wide range of career opportunities available in the construction industry. Akkerman is now a Heavy Equipment Service Tech based at Ring Power’s Orlando branch. Hugo and Harrison are both working as Heavy Equipment Service Techs in St. Augustine.

Left to right: Thomas 'Cody' Mitchko,Patrick Fortunato, Austin DuBois and Kyle Schumacher. Cameron Lankford (pictured separately) was unable to attend the signing.

As group 12 finishes their Think Big journey, Group 14 is just getting started. Thomas 'Cody' Mitchko, Patrick Fortunato, Austin DuBois, Kyle Schumacher and Cameron Lankford make up the class of 2016.  A “signing day” was held for them at Ring Power’s corporate headquarters in St. Augustine on June 30, marking the official start of their Think Big journey. Over the next two years, the students will rotate in eight-week intervals between classroom instruction at South Georgia Technical College and hands-on training at Ring Power.

Mitchko, DuBois, Schumacher and Lankford will intern in St. Augustine under Jason Bickerstaff. Fortunato will intern in Tallahassee under George Long.

Posted in: Corporate | Training

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Ring Power Corporation Announces Management Level Organizational Changes

August 5, 2014 at 9:00 AMRing Power

 

Ring Power Corporation Chairman and President Randal L. Ringhaver has announced the following management level organizational changes:

  • Senior Vice President Kevin Robbins has been appointed Executive Vice President of Sales. In addition to overseeing The Cat Rental Store, Heavy Equipment Rental, Crane, Lift Trucks, and Transportation divisions, Robbins’ responsibilities now include Heavy Equipment New and Used Sales and Power Systems Division Sales.
  • Executive Vice President David Alban has added responsibility for Power Systems Division Service to his other responsibilities, which include Heavy Equipment Product Support Sales and Service, Phoenix Products, Purchasing, Training, Human Resources, and Facilities
  • Senior Vice President Sue Miller has been charged with advancing Public Relations throughout Ring Power territory and will continue to oversee all promotional activities as Senior Vice President of Marketing. Her new title will be Senior Vice President of Marketing & Public Relations Director. 
  • Ed Sanford, Human Resources Manager, has been nominated to the office of Vice President.

These changes are being made at the management level to better align the company for continued growth and development of the next generation of managers in their respective divisions.

 

Posted in: Corporate

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Dream Traxx Video Captures Telly Award

August 1, 2014 at 8:22 AMRing Power

In June, "Find A Way: Dream Traxx,” won a 2014 Bronze Telly Award. This is quite an honor for Caterpillar, Ring Power and the customer, as the Telly Awards recognize the very best in film and video production, online videos, programs and commercials, and local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs. More than 12,000 entries from all over the world were in the running for an award this year. 

Simantel, a creative agency based in Peoria, Ill., collaborated with Rihg Power's SVP Marketing & Public Relations Director Sue Miller, Tampa Cat Rental Store Account Manager Greg Brill and Caterpillar to develop a short documentary-style video showcasing Dream Traxx – one of Greg’s customers – a company that builds top-quality, professional dirt bike tracks. The production tells a visually exciting story about an enduring relationship between the customer and Ring Power, including dramatic footage of motocross action shot from the ground and from the air using drone cameras.

The video is part of a series showcasing how Cat dealers partner with customers to help them succeed. To see the video, visit www.CatAllDay.com/FindAWay

 

Posted in: Cat Rental Store | Corporate

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Ring Power employees receive ESGR Patriot Award

July 11, 2014 at 10:27 AMRing Power

Congrats to Jason Harley (Assistant Parts Manager) and Mike Furlough (Territorial Parts Operations Manager) on receiving the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Patriot Award. Both were nominated for the award by Jared Feagin (Parts Warehouse Person) and a Specialist in the Army Reserve.

“Mr. Furlough has been the most patient and supportive supervisors I have had the pleasure of working for,” Jared wrote in his nomination. “Not once has Mr. Furlough questioned anything I had go on with my military service. I am proud to be an employee of his and Ring Power.”

Commenting on Jason, Jared wrote “Mr. Harley has not only become an acquaintance but has been so supportive of my military career. Mr. Harley has always shown his appreciation for my service to the USA. I couldn’t have asked for a better supervisor.”

“Thanks to Jared for the nomination,” Mike said. “He has been a valued employee here at Ring Power and will have a bright future with us, upon his safe return.”

Posted in: Corporate

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Ring Power Corporation Earns Top Spot on the Jacksonville Business Journal’s “Best Places to Work” List

July 10, 2014 at 1:26 PMRing Power

Ring Power Corporation, North and Central Florida’s Cat® dealer, has been named one of  North Florida’s “Best Places to Work” by the Jacksonville Business Journal.

“It’s an honor to be recognized by the Jacksonville Business Journal and our employees as one of North Florida’s “Best Places to Work,” said Sue Miller, Senior Vice President of Marketing. “Our company values — Integrity, Commitment, Excellence and Teamwork — are not just words. They are a part of our company’s culture and demonstrated by the actions of our employee’s on a daily basis.”

Ring Power ranked Number 1 in the “Best Places to Work” extra-large category based on an employee survey conducted by Quantum Workplace, an independent research firm. The survey took into account factors such as leadership, culture, benefits and employee morale.

About Ring Power Corporation

Ring Power Corporation, North and Central Florida’s Cat® dealer, is headquartered in St. Augustine, Florida. Ring Power is comprised of eight divisions and has more than 50 years of experience servicing and supporting Cat® products and allied equipment. For more information, visit www.ringpower.com

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Generator Techs Achieve EGSA Technician Certification

July 2, 2014 at 12:35 PMRing Power

Certification of personnel has become the hallmark of many industries in the U.S. today for one simple reason: It helps advance professionalism by establishing consistent standards for proficiency. 

Left to right: Wayne Long, Ron Jenkins, Devin Rawn, Randy Garrett, Shannon Puls

As part of its commitment to the on-site power industry, EGSA (Electrical Generating Systems Association) has created the Electrical Generator Systems Technician Certification program.

Left to right: Josh Carlson, Wayne Kilburn, Daniel Clifton, Rick Howard, Mike Loder.

Through rigorous testing, the program identifies those technicians who not only have a broad knowledge of electricity, mechanical and electrical components and the interaction between them, but also are proficient in the installation, service, maintenance, and repair of on-site power generation systems.

Ring Power recognizes the significance of this certification. Last month, 22 Power Systems technicians took the grueling, four-hour test on electric power generation and power systems. EGSA offers classes to help prepare applicants for the test, but — thanks to their many years of experience — our techs passed it without taking the classes.

Posted in: Power Systems

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